The organs of Paris

Eglise luthérienne

Saint-Paul

90, boulevard Barbès, 75018 Paris

1897 - Merklin

1933 - Gutschenritter

1977 - Maciet

II/13 - mechanical traction - stoplist

Photo buffet : Jeroen de Haan
Saint-Paul-de-Montmartre was built in 1896-1897. It is the work of Auguste Rey, an architect of Protestant origin (to whom we also owe the Lutheran church of BonSecours, rue Titon. in the 11th arrondissement of Paris). The style of the church is Romano-Byzantine with geometric and plant decorations. The façade is made of stone and topped by a bell tower. The interior of the church is sober and clear. The nave is composed of 4 spans opened by arches to the right and left overlooking the grandstands and aisles. Organiste titulaire Léonard Ganvert Cult with organ Sunday at 10:30 a.m.
Joseph Merklin establishments sent the parish an offer dated 18 Dec. 1897. It provided for two manual keyboards (at the Grand Orgue, 56 notes [ut-sol]: Montre, Bourdon and Salicional of 8 feet; at the Récit expressif, 56 notes [ut- sol]: Gamba and Voix Cécleste of 8 feet, Flûte octaviante of 4 feet and Bassson-Haurbois of 8 feet) and a Pedal keyboard (30 notes [ut-fa] Soubasse of 16 feet). The pipes of the manual stops were made of tin, those of the pedal of wood. The organ buffet was designed by the architect of the church, Augustin Rey. At the same time, the Merklin establishments delivered three other "Protestant" instruments, to l’Oratoire du Louvre and the Temples of Batignolles and Raincy. By 1910, the instrument had already undergone the rigors of temperature variations: pieces of wood had cracked and horns were occurring. To make matters worse, the Merklin establishments no longer seriously maintained the instrument. The organ builder was changed in 1912. In 1926, the wind engine became electric and was modified in 1929 to match the new frequency of electric current. In 1933, Georges Gutschenritter, former head of Merklin, proceeded to the complete overhaul of the organ. He had just installed the organ of the Lutheran church of La Villette (Saint-Pierre, rue Manin). In January 1977, Adrien Maciet (Montainville, Yvelines) proposed a proposal for the restoration and enlargement of the organ. In addition to the work of dismantling, dusting, repairing the pipes, restoring the (then) pneumatic traction and its transformation into direct mechanics, the composition of the instrument had to evolve: at the Grand Orgue. transformation of the Salicional 8' into a 4' Prestant and the addition of a Doublette 2’ or Plein Jeu; to the Pedal, reconstruction of the keyboard, with the addition of three real stops. A "complementary project" reported in November of the same year, states the necessary reconstruction of two new wind chests to replace the single one, which had become irreparable. The new composition of the instrument, proposed by Marie-Louise Girod-Parrot, titular of the great organ of l; Oratoire du Louvre, became: on the GO: Montre and Bourdon of 8 feet, Prestant 4'. Doublette 2'·, Plein Jeu IV on the Swell (or Positive), Cor de nuit 8', Flute 4'·, Quarte 2'·, Nasard, Tierce, Cymbale II and Hautbois 8; on the Pedal: always the Soubasse 16'. In 2021, Ie Grand Orgue includes the Montre and the Bourdon of 8' as well as the Prestant of 4'. On the Swell, which is no longer expressive, take place Ie Cor de nuit 8', the Flute octaviante 4', the Nasard and the Basson-Hautbois 8' (reassembled in the 2010s). The Pedal is unchanged. Of the six original coupling and combination pedals, only the two pulls and the coupling of the two manual keyboards now work. Yves Fossaert now maintains the instrument. Source: Le Paris des Orgues, Marathon des orgues 18 September 2021
Organs of Paris

Eglise luthérienne

Saint-Paul

90, boulevard Barbès, 75018 Paris

1897 - Merklin

1933 - Gutschenritter

1977 - Maciet

II/13 - mechanical traction - stoplist

Photo buffet : Jeroen de Haan
ORGANS OF PARIS © 2021 Vincent Hildebrandt ALL ORGANS
Saint-Paul-de-Montmartre was built in 1896-1897. It is the work of Auguste Rey, an architect of Protestant origin (to whom we also owe the Lutheran church of BonSecours, rue Titon. in the 11th arrondissement of Paris). The style of the church is Romano-Byzantine with geometric and plant decorations. The façade is made of stone and topped by a bell tower. The interior of the church is sober and clear. The nave is composed of 4 spans opened by arches to the right and left overlooking the grandstands and aisles. Organiste titulaire Léonard Ganvert Cult with organ Sunday at 10:30 a.m.
Joseph Merklin establishments sent the parish an offer dated 18 Dec. 1897. It provided for two manual keyboards (at the Grand Orgue, 56 notes [ut-sol]: Montre, Bourdon and Salicional of 8 feet; at the Récit expressif, 56 notes [ut-sol]: Gamba and Voix Cécleste of 8 feet, Flûte octaviante of 4 feet and Bassson- Haurbois of 8 feet) and a Pedal keyboard (30 notes [ut- fa] Soubasse of 16 feet). The pipes of the manual stops were made of tin, those of the pedal of wood. The organ buffet was designed by the architect of the church, Augustin Rey. At the same time, the Merklin establishments delivered three other "Protestant" instruments, to l’Oratoire du Louvre and the Temples of Batignolles and Raincy. By 1910, the instrument had already undergone the rigors of temperature variations: pieces of wood had cracked and horns were occurring. To make matters worse, the Merklin establishments no longer seriously maintained the instrument. The organ builder was changed in 1912. In 1926, the wind engine became electric and was modified in 1929 to match the new frequency of electric current. In 1933, Georges Gutschenritter, former head of Merklin, proceeded to the complete overhaul of the organ. He had just installed the organ of the Lutheran church of La Villette (Saint-Pierre, rue Manin). In January 1977, Adrien Maciet (Montainville, Yvelines) proposed a proposal for the restoration and enlargement of the organ. In addition to the work of dismantling, dusting, repairing the pipes, restoring the (then) pneumatic traction and its transformation into direct mechanics, the composition of the instrument had to evolve: at the Grand Orgue. transformation of the Salicional 8' into a 4' Prestant and the addition of a Doublette 2’ or Plein Jeu; to the Pedal, reconstruction of the keyboard, with the addition of three real stops. A "complementary project" reported in November of the same year, states the necessary reconstruction of two new wind chests to replace the single one, which had become irreparable. The new composition of the instrument, proposed by Marie-Louise Girod-Parrot, titular of the great organ of l; Oratoire du Louvre, became: on the GO: Montre and Bourdon of 8 feet, Prestant 4'. Doublette 2'·, Plein Jeu IV on the Swell (or Positive), Cor de nuit 8', Flute 4'·, Quarte 2'·, Nasard, Tierce, Cymbale II and Hautbois 8; on the Pedal: always the Soubasse 16'. In 2021, Ie Grand Orgue includes the Montre and the Bourdon of 8' as well as the Prestant of 4'. On the Swell, which is no longer expressive, take place Ie Cor de nuit 8', the Flute octaviante 4', the Nasard and the Basson-Hautbois 8' (reassembled in the 2010s). The Pedal is unchanged. Of the six original coupling and combination pedals, only the two pulls and the coupling of the two manual keyboards now work. Yves Fossaert now maintains the instrument. Source: Le Paris des Orgues, Marathon des orgues 18 September 2021